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Editor's Notes 21.1

Editor's Notes 21.1 By Joe Mackall   |  January 31, 2020
The other day I had occasion to drive through a town named Red Haw, just a few miles from my home in rural Ohio. I live in a small community, but it’s a booming metropolis compared to Red Haw, a town of Trump re-election signs, a smattering of houses, a few barns, and a Methodist church. Red Haw is an easy place to ignore, and it’s an even easier place to think you know.
Keywords: 21-1

Molly Gallentine

January 31, 2020
Molly Gallentine's nonfiction has appeared in publications such as The Wall Street Journal, Fourth Genre, and The Normal School, and is forthcoming in The New England Review. Her work can also be found in The Pushcart Prize Anthology XLIII.
Keywords: 21-1

Laurie Uttich

January 31, 2020
Laurie Uttich's prose and poetry have been published in Fourth Genre, Creative Nonfiction, Rattle, The Missouri Review, Superstition Review, Sweet, and others.
Keywords: 21-1

Leonard Winograd

January 31, 2020
You can find Leonard Winograd's work nowhere. He's the author of no books and while he's written plays, none has ever been professionally performed.
Keywords: 21-1

Nails

Nails By Kristine Crane   |  January 27, 2020
My mother’s fingernails were sculpted and strong—not like salon nails, more like the backs of beetles. Every Saturday night she’d paint them for Mass the next day—usually deep red, her favorite color.

Atlantis

Atlantis By Angie Crea O'Neal   |  January 20, 2020
"Because, what if they don't turn out okay?" The question, posed by my 14-year old daughter, hung in the air as we drove past the park after school late one afternoon. I was talking about motherhood, and she matter-of-factly justified her plan...

Jasmine

Jasmine By Leah Christianson   |  January 13, 2020
He's outside, singing. On the record player, Sinatra spins. Next, it will be Pavarotti. Maybe a big-band soundtrack. Whatever the treasure, he will make a big show of dusting off and placing a needle upon before heading back to his garden.

Home to Roost

Home to Roost By Vivian Wagner   |  January 6, 2020
I liked the hens, with their kind eyes and soft, red feathers. I was seven, and I wanted to sleep with them, to nestle with them, because they felt like a dozen mothers, all watching out for me.

Michael Steinberg: A Remembrance and a Review

Michael Steinberg: A Remembrance and a Review By Thomas Larson   |  January 3, 2020
In December 2019, in a country torn apart by Donald Trump’s bullying and Fox News’ Pravda-like misinformation, in congressional hearings that traded in the ridiculous and the profound, in a democracy under such partisan assault it seemed to buckle before our eyes, and in the month of Trump’s impeachment, we were hit with grave news of another sort: creative nonfiction’s (and my) beloved colleague, mentor, and friend, Mike Steinberg, 79, died from pancreatic cancer, undiscovered until a week before he passed.
Keywords: book review

Here. Look.

Here. Look. By Ona Gritz   |  December 30, 2019
My husband hadn't meant to render us in silhouette. He was a novice, the camera new and heavy in his hands. As we gazed out the window he didn't realize that by aiming toward it, into the sun, he'd cast us in shadow, erasing specifics.

Floodscape

Floodscape By Lauren Crandall   |  December 23, 2019
On a winter's sunny day, I can see the Minnesota River shimmering a quarter mile away--past the trail at the base of our hill, over the pond, beyond the meadow, between the walnut trees. Come spring, there is imbalance--too much snow...

Woods Cove

Woods Cove By Cynthia Belmont   |  December 16, 2019
My younger sister who is dead of cancer now is returning to the tide pools soon because I'm going to bring her. I'm going to put her back, or something meaning her, which is a palmful of calcium phosphate and sodium, powdery ash...

It Happened in Brooklyn

It Happened in Brooklyn By Alena Dillon   |  December 9, 2019
They fell in love back when Brooklyn had trolley cards. He taped her photograph to the inside of his military locker. When the war ended...

Feral Youth, Fast Cars, and Fraught Love

Feral Youth, Fast Cars, and Fraught Love By Brandel France de Bravo   |  December 2, 2019
While billed as a memoir, Knock Wood, winner of the 2018 Dzanc Nonfiction Prize, is more akin to a theme-and-variations composition: Think love-child of early Bruce Springsteen and Bach’s Goldberg Variations. An acclaimed poet, Militello tells her story in twenty-nine discrete essays that mostly eschew chronology.
Keywords: book review

Stray

Stray By Rebecca Lanning   |  December 2, 2019
She was over dogs when one appeared by their table at a beachside cafe. Strays roamed everywhere in Nosara, breedless, leashless wonders. This one had some pit bull and Corgi. Her husband thought hound. Pointy ears, long snout...

Offering

Offering By Janet Pocorobba   |  November 25, 2019
Just twelve people. People I didn’t know from Adam. I could have refused. Could've shaken my head and deferred to any one of them. Inside me, I felt a squeezing in my chest.

Home

Home By Susan Pope   |  November 18, 2019
It was just a gray concrete shell, wrapped with chain link fence. A dream home, unfinished, left to sun, dust, and rain. Around it, pastel mansions with swimming pools, iron gates, and razor wire.

A Loss for Words

A Loss for Words By Eric K. Taylor   |  November 11, 2019
This Chinese bowl, smooth in my hands, white as bone, entwined with blue dragons, reminds me of my friend Joyce's mom. Faizai she'd christened me. Fatso. (The Cantonese more affectionate than its English equivalent.)

Weight of Bones

Weight of Bones By Jennifer Filardo   |  November 4, 2019
A loon is not crazy for spending more time in the water than in the air, though the other birds may think so. He is made for it. Unlike his feathered brethren, his bones are solid. He relies on their weight to defy the buoyancy of water...

The Biology of Flesh and Bone

The Biology of Flesh and Bone By Detrick Hughes   |  November 1, 2019
In To Float in the Space Between, Terrance Hayes writes, “One’s poetics should be liquid.” Before grabbing hold of that line, I had already dipped into this book’s structure, a dialogue between Hayes, Etheridge Knight’s life and his poetry, and interviews and stories by writers acquainted with Knight’s work.
Keywords: book review

Collision

Collision By Brian Wallace Baker   |  October 28, 2019
I have questions: What would cold steel feel like on the back of my skull? How many bones would shatter? Where would I land?

Beach Day

Beach Day By Elizabeth Amon   |  October 21, 2019
Blue skies, blazing sun, of course. But honestly, it was a perfect day for fleeing steaming city streets, freezing corporate offices, our apartment, where a stuffed hippo and a crocheted blanket menaced. Everything had changed.

Scent's Memory

Scent's Memory By Tricia Theis   |  October 14, 2019
"What's the word where it reminds you of a long time ago?" I'm trying to get us out of the house and I know I sound impatient when I respond. "Nostalgia?" "Yeah," he says, "I love that smell."

Many Lives, Many Bodies

Many Lives, Many Bodies By Katy Major   |  October 7, 2019
Noble’s slim collection is teeming with ghosts of all shapes and sizes. However absent the hauntings therein may feel to her, to this reader they are vivid and immediate and bold, nestled in dreamlike prose.
Keywords: book review

Clementine Time

Clementine Time By Anna George Meek   |  October 7, 2019
There is no time but the time in the kitchen. My father loses track of days, and I buy a "clock" whose only hand moves from Monday to Tuesday to Wednesday, as if distinguishing between the days were important.

Simplify, Simplify

Simplify, Simplify By Jan Priddy   |  September 30, 2019
This could be the morning I slide out the door instead of back under sheets and escape before I drink my coffee. My arms unburdened, no one calling me back, no shame or remorse to shadow my escape. Away.

Chosen for Something

Chosen for Something By Stacy Boe Miller   |  September 23, 2019
Sometimes as a child I would brush my grandfather's thinning hair. He was a long haul trucker turned Pentecostal preacher who mostly showed affection through prayer and cash money, both of which he handed out at random to his grandkids.

Footfalls

Footfalls By Andrea Marcusa   |  September 16, 2019
On the plane home, out the window, all I see is empty sky. As a girl, when talk of dying arose, I always gazed up to where I am now, drifting past the tops of snowy clouds.

Sneakers in Sand (repeat)

Sneakers in Sand (repeat) By Dina Relles   |  September 9, 2019
The baby's shoes were nowhere. That morning was spent in the chaotic swirl of cleaning and packing the vacation house

One Word Says It All

One Word Says It All By Jenna McGuiggan   |  September 7, 2019
Where—or what—is your hearth of hearths? Where is the place you feel most alive or connected? What is the thing that reminds you who you are and to what (or whom) you belong? In all the world, what do you call home? These are some of the questions that Annick Smith and Susan O’Connor pondered as they edited Hearth: A Global Conversation on Identity, Community, and Place.
Keywords: book review

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