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Ira Sukrungruang's RT 16.1 essay, "A Meditation on Pain" featured on Longreads.com

Ira Sukrungruang's RT 16.1 essay, January 14, 2015
Longreads Member Pick on January 13, 2015.

Hands like Sunrise

Hands like Sunrise By Chris Bahnsen   |  January 12, 2015
From the riverbank I watch a great white egret on jointed stilts near a patch of tall reeds, calm as the shallows where it stands. My father would come here the way other people come to morning mass, this river his wide altar. Explosive, the egret’s yellow beak spears through its own reflection then bursts skyward throwing diamond droplets.

A Beautiful Savage Game

A Beautiful Savage Game By Amber D. Stoner   |  January 7, 2015
After forty years of watching the game, playing fantasy football, and mourning yet another Oakland Raiders’ loss, Almond no longer indulges his love of watching football and his latest book, Against Football: One Fan’s Reluctant Manifesto, explains why.

Maple Spile

Maple Spile By Erin Calabria   |  January 5, 2015
We called that hill of sugar maples at the end of Deacon Parker Road "the big bush." In March, with the sun dropping gold and the slosh of snowmelt soaking our boots, we hauled buckets of sap down from those endless trees to the waiting truck, back and forth till the air turned chill and our shoulders throbbed. We loved that time though--

Recovery

By Maria Jerinic   |  January 4, 2015
Construction resumes in my Las Vegas neighborhood. The trauma of recession recedes. Now pick-up trucks, cranes and other wheeled monstrosities I cannot name block the streets as custom homes begin to take shape. “That’s great” people say. “Just think of your property values.” “No more of those ugly empty lots.” Except that I love those lots...

Skipping

Skipping By Elettra Pauletto   |  December 29, 2014
It’s nearly dinner time in Mweso, a small village in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, but the nuns I’m staying with insist they don’t need my help preparing it. So I relax on the porch and watch the road across the clearing, where villagers walk by on bent knees, flanked by tall trees with leaves like unfurled swan wings. The war is near, but not here, not now.

The Best Time

The Best Time By Linda Crowe   |  December 22, 2014
Nighttime is the best time. I peek in and watch him sleep in his dim room. Sometimes he talks in his dreams. "Mansion Hills, yeah, yeah. Mansion Hills. Good old 2807," and I know he’s wandering through his house and his neighborhood, a nice enough neighborhood, but with a name far above its station.

#RTNC2015 Holiday Book List

December 18, 2014
Looking for last-minute gift ideas? How about some books by #RTNC2015 presenters, or a gift certificate to the conference?

Lost Tribe

Lost Tribe By Jennifer Alessi   |  December 15, 2014
We called it "seek and go hide" because we thought it sounded cooler. In summer we’d play all day long. After quick cereal breakfasts, we’d gather on our rural street—aged six to ten or so, Lee jeans and tattered tees, mosquito bites like satellite maps on our elbows.

2014 Pushcart Nominations

December 12, 2014
River Teeth editors are pleased to announce this year's Pushcart nominations.
Keywords: pushcart, river teeth

Playboy

Playboy By Steven Harvey   |  December 8, 2014
When my mother caught Chris and me looking at Playboy, we knew we were in trouble, but to my surprise she did not get angry. She took me into the house and pulled out the large glossy art books with paintings by the Impressionists. “A woman’s body is beautiful,” she told me.

The Infinitely Unending Art of Judith Kitchen

The Infinitely Unending Art of Judith Kitchen By Marilyn Bousquin   |  December 1, 2014
Judith Kitchen, writer, editor, critic, and teacher, died at the age of 73 on November 6, 2014, after living with metastasized breast cancer, the subject of The Circus Train. I choose the word “living” deliberately because Kitchen’s presence—her aliveness on the page—is a swirling force behind many memorable passages in the book...

Turkey Soup

Turkey Soup By Marissa Landrigan   |  December 1, 2014
On Thanksgiving, after the turkey is carved and gutted – after we slice through half of the twenty-pound bird my mother insists on ordering, though there are only ever seven of us for dinner – my father and grandfather return to the half-spent carcass and harvest the rest.

Raindrops

Raindrops By Linda Dunlavy   |  November 24, 2014
A thunderstorm breaks this morning. Afterwards, my nine-year-old daughter calls me to come outside and look. I go, resisting the temptation to finish washing the dishes first. My youngest child won’t be young much longer. The soft, still air feels like forgiveness after the sky’s wild outburst. My daughter is admiring hundreds of raindrops clinging to spider webs in the corner of our front stairs. I usually remove these webs with a flick of the broom. But not today – they are transformed, bejeweled, and their splendor leaves me powerless to disturb them.

Podcast Interview with Vanessa Grigoriadis

Podcast Interview with Vanessa Grigoriadis By Matt Tullis   |  November 19, 2014
In this episode of Gangrey: The Podcast, Matt Tullis talks with Vanessa Grigoriadis, an award winning contributor for national magazines. She talks about pop culture, journalistic research and some of her recent articles.

Rocket Scientist

Rocket Scientist By Andrea Caswell   |  November 17, 2014
As a child, when adults asked what I wanted to be when I grew up, I had plenty of answers, but they all sounded like Halloween costumes. Race-car driver. Astronaut. Olympic track star. My father was a rocket scientist for NASA, so the idea that a person could be anything, in this world or beyond, was real to me.

The Giant Dipper

The Giant Dipper By Julie Marie Wade   |  November 10, 2014
When I ask her “What was the greatest adventure of your life?”, my grandmother grows quiet. Like all questions I have ever asked, she takes this one seriously. I watch her lips part along their narrow seam, the glint of gold visible between her two front teeth.

Raise High the Roof Beam, Women Authors

Raise High the Roof Beam, Women Authors By Josette Kubaszyk   |  November 3, 2014
Since its inception, Shebooks’ digital collection of downloadable fiction, memoir, and journalism has grown to over 70 books, each of which the publishers say can be read “in an hour or two.” Their library is composed of works by both new and established writers. We review three selections in this month's book review.

Missing

Missing By Riane Konc   |  November 3, 2014
You have been ours for ten months, and tomorrow, the state will return you to your mother. Not ours, of course. We know. Foster parents have no rights, not really. Friends and family of foster parents certainly don’t, no matter how many braids we tie, or school assemblies we attend, or baths we draw. I know the words on your spelling list for next week--you’ve been struggling with affect and effect--but it doesn’t matter, because tomorrow you will go home, and though we don’t know it--though we give you our phone numbers and beg you to call, we will never hear from you again.

Last Lure

Last Lure By Marilyn Borell   |  October 27, 2014
Waiting to take the ferry across Alaska’s Russian River to the more fruitful south bank, I poke around the breast pockets of a fishing vest I haven’t worn in years and come up with a fly, one tied by my father at my kitchen table in the late 1990’s. I know this, because Dad always pried the business end of the hook a little more open when he finished. The hook is dressed in hunter orange hair, wrapped tight on the shaft with black thread, secured with strokes of my clear nail polish.

Podcast Interview with Earl Swift

Podcast Interview with Earl Swift By Matt Tullis   |  October 27, 2014
In this episode of Gangrey: The Podcast, Matt Tullis talks with Earl Swift, the author of Auto Biography: A Classic Car, An Outlaw Motorhead, and 57 Years of the American Dream. The book tells the life story of a 1957 Chevy that, at the beginning of the book, is falling apart.

Trike

Trike By Louise Krug   |  October 20, 2014
Depending on whom you talked to, it was either a recumbent bicycle or an adult tricycle. There was a big difference between the two terms. “Recumbent bicycle” sounded like a serious piece of machinery, and called to Louise’s mind old men who wore spandex shorts and sucked packets of energy gel. “Adult tricycle,” though, sounded too special, something for people who could not ride a two-wheeled bicycle, and well, who couldn't do that? It was like saying “Adult crib” or “Adult diaper”—something for the very old, the almost gone from this world.

4th Annual Nonfiction Conference Will Feature Cheryl Strayed and Jerald Walker

4th Annual Nonfiction Conference Will Feature Cheryl Strayed and Jerald Walker October 16, 2014
The 4th annual River Teeth nonfiction conference will be May 29-31, 2015 on the Ashland University campus. Join us for readings, seminars, and manuscript consultations. Speakers and guests include perennial favorites as well as new faces to River Teeth.

Edge of the Chesapeake

Edge of the Chesapeake By Andrea Mummert   |  October 13, 2014
My legs dangle off the dock. Clear water flows under my feet. Rows of low waves move toward me in slow parallel lines, disappearing below the boards. A white streak of light runs the crest of each wave, and the slightly shadowed troughs glisten powder-steel blue. I can see to the marsh bottom. Evenly spaced ridges in the mud look like imprints of the wavelets on the water’s surface. In my throat rises a feeling of being filled, but at the same time, longing.

Rain

Rain By Robert Root   |  October 6, 2014
Our children are up to their knees in the waves before we notice the dark cloud above the lake, a blur of rain below it, moving toward us. As I wade out to them, the cloud comes closer, and we return to the beach. Within minutes the sky darkens overhead and the first chilly raindrops strike bare shoulders and backs. Under towels wrapped around us, token protection against the rain, we huddle together while other bathers retreat, leaving us alone at the water’s edge in the rain. Then I see my granddaughter, the ten-year-old, still standing in breaking waves and falling rain, smiling at us, shrugging nonchalantly, never flinching.

To the Body Born

To the Body Born By Jan Shoemaker   |  October 1, 2014
“I started my martial arts training on the day the Gulf War began,” Peggy Shinner recalls. It was a discipline she would go on to master and teach. Moving across the page in her essay collection, You Feel So Mortal, with the same agility she took to the polished wood of the dojo floor, Shinner explores the flesh and blood experience—hers and ours—of having a body.

River Teeth Featured This Fall

River Teeth Featured This Fall September 30, 2014
Look for articles featuring River Teeth in the November issue of The Writer and in The Review Review online Tips.

Holding

Holding By Kathryn Wilder   |  September 29, 2014
My sister and I live on either side of sixty. We've been mothers half our lives. Visiting her in Oregon, Ashland, running a steady hundred degrees for days into weeks, we head to Lake of the Woods for the coolness of lake water and wind in the pines. Winding up the mountainside and back through our lives, our four children are never far from our conversation, like our own childhood—childhood, singular, as we shared it, for better or worse, till death do we part. One minute I'm driving my sister's Honda Fit through the forest; the next instant something bounces from the trees onto the road in front of me like a basketball, and that color, and stops.

Chalk on Pavement

Chalk on Pavement By Tami Mohamed Brown   |  September 22, 2014
At the far end of the empty park-and-ride lot, a silver Toyota jerks its way across the yellow painted parking lines in starts and stops. Someone, presumably, is learning to drive. Sprawled sideways on the ground, I pull an oversized piece of pink sidewalk chalk across the uneven cement, my hand echoing the jerks of the car in an attempt to carefully form letters on a square of pavement next to the bus shelter, the rough concrete cold under my hands.

Best American Science and Nature Writing 2014 Notable

September 16, 2014
Congratulations to Katie Fallon, whose essay "Rebirth" is listed as a notable essay in this year's Best American Science and Nature Writing 2014.

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