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Rocket Scientist

Rocket Scientist By Andrea Caswell   |  November 17, 2014
As a child, when adults asked what I wanted to be when I grew up, I had plenty of answers, but they all sounded like Halloween costumes. Race-car driver. Astronaut. Olympic track star. My father was a rocket scientist for NASA, so the idea that a person could be anything, in this world or beyond, was real to me.

The Giant Dipper

The Giant Dipper By Julie Marie Wade   |  November 10, 2014
When I ask her “What was the greatest adventure of your life?”, my grandmother grows quiet. Like all questions I have ever asked, she takes this one seriously. I watch her lips part along their narrow seam, the glint of gold visible between her two front teeth.

Raise High the Roof Beam, Women Authors

Raise High the Roof Beam, Women Authors By Josette Kubaszyk   |  November 3, 2014
Since its inception, Shebooks’ digital collection of downloadable fiction, memoir, and journalism has grown to over 70 books, each of which the publishers say can be read “in an hour or two.” Their library is composed of works by both new and established writers. We review three selections in this month's book review.

Missing

Missing By Riane Konc   |  November 3, 2014
You have been ours for ten months, and tomorrow, the state will return you to your mother. Not ours, of course. We know. Foster parents have no rights, not really. Friends and family of foster parents certainly don’t, no matter how many braids we tie, or school assemblies we attend, or baths we draw. I know the words on your spelling list for next week--you’ve been struggling with affect and effect--but it doesn’t matter, because tomorrow you will go home, and though we don’t know it--though we give you our phone numbers and beg you to call, we will never hear from you again.

Last Lure

Last Lure By Marilyn Borell   |  October 27, 2014
Waiting to take the ferry across Alaska’s Russian River to the more fruitful south bank, I poke around the breast pockets of a fishing vest I haven’t worn in years and come up with a fly, one tied by my father at my kitchen table in the late 1990’s. I know this, because Dad always pried the business end of the hook a little more open when he finished. The hook is dressed in hunter orange hair, wrapped tight on the shaft with black thread, secured with strokes of my clear nail polish.

Podcast Interview with Earl Swift

Podcast Interview with Earl Swift By Matt Tullis   |  October 27, 2014
In this episode of Gangrey: The Podcast, Matt Tullis talks with Earl Swift, the author of Auto Biography: A Classic Car, An Outlaw Motorhead, and 57 Years of the American Dream. The book tells the life story of a 1957 Chevy that, at the beginning of the book, is falling apart.

Trike

Trike By Louise Krug   |  October 20, 2014
Depending on whom you talked to, it was either a recumbent bicycle or an adult tricycle. There was a big difference between the two terms. “Recumbent bicycle” sounded like a serious piece of machinery, and called to Louise’s mind old men who wore spandex shorts and sucked packets of energy gel. “Adult tricycle,” though, sounded too special, something for people who could not ride a two-wheeled bicycle, and well, who couldn't do that? It was like saying “Adult crib” or “Adult diaper”—something for the very old, the almost gone from this world.

4th Annual Nonfiction Conference Will Feature Cheryl Strayed and Jerald Walker

4th Annual Nonfiction Conference Will Feature Cheryl Strayed and Jerald Walker October 16, 2014
The 4th annual River Teeth nonfiction conference will be May 29-31, 2015 on the Ashland University campus. Join us for readings, seminars, and manuscript consultations. Speakers and guests include perennial favorites as well as new faces to River Teeth.

Edge of the Chesapeake

Edge of the Chesapeake By Andrea Mummert   |  October 13, 2014
My legs dangle off the dock. Clear water flows under my feet. Rows of low waves move toward me in slow parallel lines, disappearing below the boards. A white streak of light runs the crest of each wave, and the slightly shadowed troughs glisten powder-steel blue. I can see to the marsh bottom. Evenly spaced ridges in the mud look like imprints of the wavelets on the water’s surface. In my throat rises a feeling of being filled, but at the same time, longing.

Rain

Rain By Robert Root   |  October 6, 2014
Our children are up to their knees in the waves before we notice the dark cloud above the lake, a blur of rain below it, moving toward us. As I wade out to them, the cloud comes closer, and we return to the beach. Within minutes the sky darkens overhead and the first chilly raindrops strike bare shoulders and backs. Under towels wrapped around us, token protection against the rain, we huddle together while other bathers retreat, leaving us alone at the water’s edge in the rain. Then I see my granddaughter, the ten-year-old, still standing in breaking waves and falling rain, smiling at us, shrugging nonchalantly, never flinching.

To the Body Born

To the Body Born By Jan Shoemaker   |  October 1, 2014
“I started my martial arts training on the day the Gulf War began,” Peggy Shinner recalls. It was a discipline she would go on to master and teach. Moving across the page in her essay collection, You Feel So Mortal, with the same agility she took to the polished wood of the dojo floor, Shinner explores the flesh and blood experience—hers and ours—of having a body.

River Teeth Featured This Fall

River Teeth Featured This Fall September 30, 2014
Look for articles featuring River Teeth in the November issue of The Writer and in The Review Review online Tips.

Holding

Holding By Kathryn Wilder   |  September 29, 2014
My sister and I live on either side of sixty. We've been mothers half our lives. Visiting her in Oregon, Ashland, running a steady hundred degrees for days into weeks, we head to Lake of the Woods for the coolness of lake water and wind in the pines. Winding up the mountainside and back through our lives, our four children are never far from our conversation, like our own childhood—childhood, singular, as we shared it, for better or worse, till death do we part. One minute I'm driving my sister's Honda Fit through the forest; the next instant something bounces from the trees onto the road in front of me like a basketball, and that color, and stops.

Chalk on Pavement

Chalk on Pavement By Tami Mohamed Brown   |  September 22, 2014
At the far end of the empty park-and-ride lot, a silver Toyota jerks its way across the yellow painted parking lines in starts and stops. Someone, presumably, is learning to drive. Sprawled sideways on the ground, I pull an oversized piece of pink sidewalk chalk across the uneven cement, my hand echoing the jerks of the car in an attempt to carefully form letters on a square of pavement next to the bus shelter, the rough concrete cold under my hands.

Best American Science and Nature Writing 2014 Notable

September 16, 2014
Congratulations to Katie Fallon, whose essay "Rebirth" is listed as a notable essay in this year's Best American Science and Nature Writing 2014.

Sign Language

Sign Language By Asha Dore   |  September 15, 2014
The motion of the body. Exchange of truths. Listening without the ears. Telling without the mouth. My daughter points to her chin and signs, my favorite then points to a moth that bumbles through the air on the other side of the sliding glass door. When the moth lands on the door, she moves toward it. She presses her hand on its glass. Wing against wing. The words she will fling through the twitch of her knuckles, the clasp of her palms, the flap of her wrists. Years and years of words, of stories that reach past hearing, past telling. Stories that reach into the skin.

Podcast Interview with Eli Saslow

Podcast Interview with Eli Saslow By Matt Tullis   |  September 11, 2014
Eli Saslow is a reporter at the Washington Post. Earlier this year, he won the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting for his series of stories on food stamps in a post-recession America.

Wildflowers

Wildflowers By Patrice Gopo   |  September 8, 2014
To the right of my childhood home, where the grass melted into a thick wood, our tree’s steady wooden arms embraced two sisters and their imaginary games. I remember low branches covered with lichen and soft moss, just a foot or two above dark soil. The dip between branch and trunk served as a sort of woodland lap, a seat to welcome even the most unlikely tree climber. From early morning, we slid our hands across peeling birch bark while our feet peeked from beneath a cap of bright, green leaves. By day’s end, sticky, brown sap stained sleeves, palms and pant legs.

Best American Essays Notables 2014

Best American Essays Notables 2014 September 4, 2014
The Notable Essays list from The Best American Essays 2014 includes River Teeth's fall contributors Bettye Kearse and Dan Lehman and essays from Senior Editor Steven Harvey, Managing Editor Sarah Wells, and Beautiful Things column Co-Editor Michelle Webster-Hein

The Nothing That Is Not There and the Nothing That Is

The Nothing That Is Not There and the Nothing That Is By Doug Rutledge   |  September 3, 2014
In Praise of Nothing is both an interesting and a frustrating book. It’s interesting in its attempt to write a postmodern memoir. It’s frustrating, however, because it does not fulfill the reader’s conventional expectations of coherence and meaning. Postmodern thinkers, such as Roland Barthes, are highly skeptical of the idea of human agency and would also doubt the coherence of the self. They believe the idea that a human being who is a psychologically whole and stable person is largely fictionalized. Therefore, LeMay has written an unstable memoir.

The End of the Movie

The End of the Movie By Christopher Bundy   |  September 1, 2014
Today: summer afternoon on the front porch as thunderheads grow over the top of a giant oak. In the yard you perform perfect cartwheels, your legs long and straight in the air. Watch this, Daddy, you say, and execute another textbook cartwheel before you bounce up the steps to sit in my lap and rest your head against mine. You stare at the darkening sky. A breeze lifts your hair as distant thunder rumbles. This is like the end of the movie, you say.

Lee Martin

August 28, 2014
Lee Martin is the author of the novels, The Bright Forever, a finalist for the 2006 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction; Break the Skin; River of Heaven; and Quakertown. He has also published three memoirs, From Our House, Turning Bones, and Such a Life; and a short story collection, The Least You Need to Know. He teaches in the MFA program at The Ohio State University, where he is a past winner of the Alumni Distinguished Teaching Award.
Keywords: 10, 14-1, 16-1, 3-2, 6-1, 8-2

Sydney Lea

August 28, 2014
Sydney Lea, a former Pulitzer finalist, founded and for thirteen years edited New England Review. His thirteenth collection of poems, Here, is due from Four Way Books in 2019.
Keywords: 13-1, 13-2, 16-1, 2-1, 20-1, 3-1, 8-1

Falling featured on Longreads.com

August 28, 2014
Debie Thomas's fine essay, "Falling," from our fall 2013 issue of River Teeth, was featured as a longreads.com member pick August 14, 2014.

Editor's Notes, Volume 16, Number 1

Editor's Notes, Volume 16, Number 1 By Joe Mackall   |  August 28, 2014
We at River Teeth talk a lot about what the journal has meant to us during our first fifteen years. What we’ve discovered doesn’t surprise us now, but it would have fifteen years ago. It’s the people: the people we’ve met, the people we’ve published, the people who came of age as creative nonfiction writers reading River Teeth. It’s all pretty damn humbling, to be sure.

Volume 16 Number 1

Volume 16 Number 1 August 28, 2014
featuring work by Jonathan Starke, Britt Leach, Elizabeth Arnold, Lee Martin, Nancy Lord, Sydney Lea, Ira Sukrungruang, Anne Panning, Melissa Matthewson, Jacqueline Haskins, Pamela Schmid, Ron Clinton Smith, and Hannah Hindley
Keywords: 16-1

Elizabeth Arnold

August 28, 2014
Elizabeth Arnold is a graduate of the MFA program at the Rainier Writing Workshop. Her work has previously appeared in such places as The Gettysburg Review, The Whitefish Review, Superstition Review, and elsewhere. Her essays have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and been listed as notable in The Best American Essays. She lives on a working farm in Central Pennsylvania with her husband, horses, chickens, and dogs.
Keywords: 16-1

Jacqueline Haskins

August 28, 2014
Jacqueline Haskins is a biologist of watery wilds, from cypress swamps to cirque swales. Her nonfiction has received a Pushcart nomination and been a finalist in Oregon Quarterly’s Northwest Perspectives Contest. Jacqueline received her Masters in Biostatistics from U. of Washington, and her MFA from NW Institute of Literary Arts. Her nonfiction, poetry, or fiction appear in Cordite Poetry Review, Raven Chronicles, Cirque Journal, Meadowland Review, The Collapsar, Shark Reef Literary Magazine, and elsewhere. Visit her at JacquelineHaskins.com.
Keywords: 16-1

Hannah Hindley

August 28, 2014
Hannah Hindley is a field educator and wilderness guide with a B.A. in English from Harvard University. She is a published writer of both truthful and fictional stories and is the recipient of the Thomas Wood Award in Journalism and the winner of the New Conrads Writing Contest for Jack Tar Magazine. She currently works as a naturalist aboard a small adventure boat and is daily witness to Alaska’s ice melt—and the changes that come with it—during her long summer seasons spent in Glacier Bay National Park and the Alexander Archipelago.
Keywords: 16-1

Britt Leach

August 28, 2014
Britt Leach was an actor for thirty-odd years and at the end of that career started writing. He co-published, co-edited and wrote for Country Connections, a nationally distributed, award-winning magazine nurtured in the mountains north of Los Angeles. He also wrote and published two websites: Impertinent Information and Veritas—Any Day Now featuring his satire, poetry and essays toward memoir. He is married to Catherine Roberts Leach, a fine art photographer. Without whom, nothing. He now lives in Los Angeles.
Keywords: 16-1

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