Blog

First ... 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 [21] 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 ... Last 

Somniloquy

Somniloquy By Michael Levan   |  March 28, 2016
Trained by his body to wake now every two hours, he doesn't much need her voice to tell him it's time for more meds. So at first, when he stirs from his makeshift bed on their floor, he thinks she's talking to him.

Mountains

Mountains By Erin Slaughter   |  March 21, 2016
It is always almost raining. That's something they never tell you about Seattle; they talk about the rain, but not the days the air holds its breath.

Scott Russell Sanders to Visit Ashland

Scott Russell Sanders to Visit Ashland March 16, 2016
Scott Russell Sanders is coming to Ashland, Ohio on April 13 as part of the Ashland University English Department's Spring Reading Series.

Safety Popcorn

Safety Popcorn By Sarah Thieman   |  March 14, 2016
When I was a young child, once a week and sometimes more, my father cooked homemade popcorn in the WhirleyPop then seasoned it with garlic powder, Parmesan cheese, and sea salt. He divided it into two separate bowls -- one big blue bowl and another white square bowl with red stripes, a gift from his mother.
Keywords: family  |   7 comments

Growing Season

Growing Season By Verna Kale   |  March 7, 2016
"Do you remember anything from before you were born?" I ask.

"Beautiful Things" post receives a Pushcart Nomination!

March 4, 2016
The Pushcart Prize Board of Contributing Editors has nominated a piece of flash nonfiction from the River Teeth weekly "Beautiful Things" column. Congratulations to author Kate Levin for this recognition!

Out of Sight

Out of Sight By Richard Gilbert   |  March 1, 2016
A wizard behind the U.S. space program, German rocket scientist Wernher von Braun, once likened space missions to the ocean voyages of ancient mariners. The analogy seems perfect, but the sea, while harsh, isn't instantly fatal to shipwrecked sailors.

Sneakers in Sand

Sneakers in Sand By Dina Relles   |  February 29, 2016
The baby's shoes were nowhere. That morning was spent in the chaotic swirl of cleaning and packing the vacation house. Countertops lined with coffee cups, milky-bottomed cereal bowls, last laundry loads, shouts up the staircase, don’t forget the shampoo in the shower! It was New Year’s Eve. We had a flight to catch.

My Father's Only Recipe

My Father's Only Recipe By Kim Liao   |  February 22, 2016
First, take pork spare ribs. Hack them up with an impossibly large cleaver into bite-sized pieces. Rub them with a proprietary mix of star anise, black beans, garlic, soy sauce, hoisin sauce, ginger, and secrets. Never ask him what happened in Taiwan, or why his mother never spoke the name of her former husband again.
Keywords: beautiful things  |   11 comments

Stay With Me Awhile (repeat)

Stay With Me Awhile (repeat) By Gina Williams   |  February 15, 2016
In honor of Valentine's Day, please enjoy this selection from the Beautiful Things archives....
Keywords: beautiful things

Book Prize Winner is Rosemary McGuire

Book Prize Winner is Rosemary McGuire February 9, 2016
The winner of this year's Nonfiction Book Prize is Rosemary McGuire. Her memoir entitled "Out West: A Season on Water" is a coming of age tale set in the Alaskan fishing industry.

Waiting for Owls

Waiting for Owls By Mark Liebenow   |  February 8, 2016
Evening returns to the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and the land cools. Day follows the sun across the valley floor and up into the mountains in the west. Birds settle down for the night.
Keywords: nature  |   6 comments

Legacy of Lobotomy

Legacy of Lobotomy By Denise Wilkinson   |  February 4, 2016
Janet Sternburg grew up in a tight-knit, lower-middle-class Jewish family, in Boston, the niece of a lobotomised uncle and aunt.

Back Aisles

Back Aisles By Ashley Hutson   |  February 1, 2016
The library building was my body like your children are your body, like your spouse is your body. Its wood and glass grew out of my chest. It came with a key and code.
Keywords: library  |   4 comments

The Art of the Drought

The Art of the Drought By Catherine Rankovic   |  January 25, 2016
The art of the drought is to reduce all things to their outlines. Leaves fall. Plants skeletonize. Dry outlines of worms and lizards, victims of the heat, are marked on the asphalt.

Each and Both

Each and Both January 19, 2016
Garth Evans and Leila Philip's Water Rising calls to mind the way Merce Cunningham and John Cage worked side by side while living together as life partners. Cunningham and Cage joined dance and music by intentional collaborative chance. How do you produce a work of art that exists in two minds and media yet is created independently and concurrently? Somehow, Garth Evans and Leila Philip, who are married, have done this -- and more.

The Begonia is Blooming

The Begonia is Blooming By Danielle Harms   |  January 18, 2016
You leave home. You move in and out of apartments in faraway places. None have a yard, and you dream about the green spaces of your childhood, where cottonwood floated between trees and covered the screen porch like a fleece. Then you move to the English Basement with a brick patio. You fill it with potted plants. Your begonia becomes a riot of pink petals. You touch its waxy leaves. It makes you feel wild again. It makes you feel more whole.

Sewing Notions

Sewing Notions By Karen Zey   |  January 11, 2016
After the funeral, my sister spreads the contents of our mother’s wooden sewing box across the kitchen table. Mom gave up sewing as she faded in old age, but she clung to these bits and bobs. We gaze at the jumbled spools of thread, loops of white elastic and packets of seam binder in yellowed cellophane. I spot the jar of odd buttons, a nest of tiny jewels from the past.

Recovery

Recovery By Maria Jerinic   |  January 4, 2016
Construction resumes in my Las Vegas neighborhood. The trauma of recession recedes. Now pick-up trucks, cranes and other wheeled monstrosities I cannot name block the streets as custom homes begin to take shape. "That's great" people say. "Just think of your property values." "No more of those ugly empty lots." Except that I love those lots...

Visitation

Visitation By Kelsey E. Moore   |  December 28, 2015
On the porch, under a Blood Moon, our fire is dying down, so we wear wool blankets over our shoulders. We’re drinking cider warmed in a pan on the stove, splashed into mugs with whiskey. This cold is still new, still exhilarating; the season is shifting, like the roll of a wave against your body. Out across the salt marsh, somewhere deep in the pines, the coyotes begin to howl. It is a sound that is hard not to love, even as it ripples through you, awakening a fear that sleeps at the base of your spine.

The Natural Resonant Frequency of Glass

The Natural Resonant Frequency of Glass By Meg Senuta   |  December 21, 2015
We lingered after dinner in a cavernous ill-lit restaurant that was empty, except for my husband and me, and our two young boys, and a couple who were seated far on the other side of the room. Warm and full, we were in no hurry to suit up for winter, which waited outdoors.

Interruptions

Interruptions By Sheldon Lawrence   |  December 14, 2015
Seek stillness. Close your eyes, relax in the lotus position, and breathe deeply. But hold on tight. Search every corner of the cosmos and you find only a universe in motion.

The Ladder Tree

The Ladder Tree By Beth Taylor   |  December 7, 2015
Hand-built, smoothed gray with age, the stubby ladder rests against the old apple tree, its gnarled bark accepting the still, hopeful embrace of the rails and rungs once climbed by a child when this tree by its stone wall watched over a field of corn, or was it cows, instead of this fervent jungle – green vines wrapping bushes and spindly trees, sprung from seeds blown down by wind-flung torrents of rain, and allowed to grow, unchecked by the farmer, father of that child, both now long gone, their spirits left behind, lurking in nature’s veils that canopy the path, dappling sun into shade as we walk on a summer's day, wondering: what child, living how, climbed to pick, or to see, so long ago; and accepting, as we wander, our own graying but patient embrace.

A Wildly Funny Life Story -- I, Too, Admire Your Shoes!

A Wildly Funny Life Story -- I, Too, Admire Your Shoes! By Glen Retief   |  December 1, 2015
"I want to write the moral history of the men of my generation," wrote Flaubert to his friend Mademoiselle Leroyer in 1864, talking of what would become his semi-autobiographical novel, Sentimental Education....Substitute women for men, memoir for novel, feminism for nineteenth-century bohemianism, and place our young-to-middle-aged protagonist in a green miniskirt in a Sun Belt college town. There you have, more or less, the themes and plot of Debra Monroe's new memoir, My Unsentimental Education, which updates Flaubert's novel for our own suburban, gender-redefining times.

Linda on the Beach

Linda on the Beach By Denise Duhamel and Julie Marie Wade   |  November 30, 2015
We don’t know her, the woman who grins and waves as we wander north along Hollywood sand, bedsheets for yoga class billowing in our hands. But maybe, I think, we do know her from somewhere, and it’s not in our nature to be rude, so we wave, too. Linda is flapping like the lifeguard’s flag. Linda is talking about her lost keys, about her husband in the hospital, about the Marriott that won’t take her back now. We look at each other to acknowledge Linda is crazy, possibly homeless.

Peanut Butter

Peanut Butter By Dorothy Rice   |  November 23, 2015
What was that feeling last night, of chasing a thread of thought from sleep to wakefulness, back into sleep again, not quite sure at any moment whether I was fully awake

Stephen Benz

November 20, 2015
Along with two books of travel essays—Guatemalan Journey (University of Texas Press) and Green Dreams: Travels in Central America (Lonely Planet)—Stephen Benz has published essays in Creative Nonfiction, TriQuarterly, Los Angeles Review, and other journals. Two of his essays have been selected for the Best American Travel Writing series. Formerly a writer for Tropic, the Sunday magazine of the Miami Herald, he now teaches professional writing at the University of New Mexico and is on the faculty of the Taos Summer Writers’ Conference.
Keywords: 17-1

Jill Christman

November 20, 2015
Jill Christman is the author of Darkroom: A Family Exposure (AWP Award Series in Creative Nonfiction winner), Borrowed Babies: Apprenticing for Motherhood (Shebooks 2014), and essays in magazines and journals such as Brevity, Fourth Genre, Iron Horse Literary Review, Literary Mama, Oprah Magazine, and Brain, Child. She teaches creative nonfiction writing in Ashland University’s low-residency MFA program and at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, where she lives with her husband, writer Mark Neely, and their two children.
Keywords: 17-1, 19-2

Karen Dietrich

November 20, 2015
Karen Dietrich is the author of The Girl Factory (Rowman & Littlefield, 2013). Her writing has appeared in Smokelong Quarterly, The Bellingham Review, Specter, and elsewhere.
Keywords: 17-1

Tom Fate

November 20, 2015
Tom Fate is the author of five books of nonfiction, including Beyond the White Noise, a collection of essays, Steady and Trembling, a spiritual memoir, and Cabin Fever, a nature memoir. A regular contributor to the Chicago Tribune, his essays have appeared in The Boston Globe, Orion, Iowa Review, Fourth Genre, River Teeth, and many other journals and anthologies, and they have often aired on National Public Radio and Chicago Public Radio. He teaches creative writing at College of DuPage in Chicago.
Keywords: 17-1, 19-2

Newsletter Sign Up

shadow shadow