Blog

First 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... Last 

The Last To Turn In

The Last To Turn In By Katie Greulich   |  June 28, 2021
Everyone went to sleep, except my cousin and me. I lingered a bit, my own children upstairs, sprawled across air mattresses, or burrowed in rented cribs. He wanted to stay awake, to party. Or at least have a companion to watch It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia.

The Extinction Museum: Exhibit #207 (Glass Coke Bottle—Labeled “Helium”)

The Extinction Museum: Exhibit #207 (Glass Coke Bottle—Labeled “Helium”)	By Tina May Hall   |  June 21, 2021
Parties were for destroying. You hit the patient hero with a stick until he broke open to rain down candy. Every wall was filled with pinholes and sword dents. In the backyard, your friends tore up the grass in handfuls, sundering unwary worms, leaving gouges to slip on after rain.

Ceremony

Ceremony By Robert Barham   |  June 14, 2021
She dances beside the highway each morning. You're driving your son to school, in thick traffic with lights to make, when you notice her across a stretch of construction and broken streets. Bearing marks of itinerancy and sleeping rough, she reaches the center of an empty lot, and it begins: a dancer’s poise with sure cadence and confident, inevitable steps.

Reclamation

Reclamation By Justin Florey   |  June 7, 2021
The Army Corp of Engineers lowered the water level of the Mississippi River below St. Anthony Falls so they could inspect the locks. My wife took the kids down there at my suggestion. Children frolicked in areas where, in any other circumstance, they would surely drown.

We Might As Well Die Laughing

We Might As Well Die Laughing By David MacWilliams   |  June 4, 2021
John Rember’s essay collection is both delightful and depressing. The ten essays, each divided into ten segments (thus, the “hundred little pieces”), flesh out his perspective as our civilization and its natural environment crumbles.
Keywords: book review

Notes to My Father

Notes to My Father By Kathy Fagan   |  May 31, 2021
On most surfaces in my house, you'll find short notes I've written for my father. I flip the phone's camera on FaceTime so he can read them when he can't hear me. He mouths them slowly out loud: Be good and obey nurses. Put hearing aids in ears. Today is Jacob’s birthday. Stay awake in daylight and sleep in the dark. Change into clean clothes or God won’t take you to heaven. Call after dinner. I love you.

Command

Command By John Bonanni   |  May 24, 2021
It's nearing Easter, 2020. My lover, David, and I watch The Ten Commandments with Charlton Heston. We break it up across three days, one hour per day. I always associated Heston with the NRA, with white old man gun-toting Uhmerca toxic masculinity, but the more I watch, the more Moses’s shoulders and thighs seem to flex, seem to bulge out of the screen, oiled.

The Drive Home

The Drive Home By Kimberly Goode   |  May 17, 2021
We pulled out of the driveway. Our destination: Newark International Airport for a pre-dawn flight back to Seattle. My father drove his Ford Taurus just below the speed limit. Staring out the window, I thought of all the times we'd travelled this road together before.

Reading

Reading By Susan Hodara   |  May 10, 2021
I am reading. I have spun into the writer's words, how his grandmother curled and uncurled the telephone cord around her fingers. I remember those curly cords, how the coils unspooled when you walked around, and then jumped back, spiraling in on themselves, hanging like a wonky rubber ringlet.

Essays All: However We Decide to Collect Them

Essays All: However We Decide to Collect Them By Beth Alvarado   |  May 4, 2021
When I was sending out an early version of my manuscript, Anxious Attachments (2019), several agents, who were all interested in the book, asked me to revise it so it would be a “memoir in essays” and not an essay collection, as I thought of the book.
Keywords: book review

On the Afternoon I Write My Husband Another Note

On the Afternoon I Write My Husband Another Note By Amanda Yanowski   |  May 3, 2021
I sit in my gray office and scribble words onto a piece of stationary I wish I could remember picking out, yellow flowers wrapping around the edges. Believe me when I say I do not have a choice. And I am so sorry. And I tried to fix myself.

Not That Kind of Royalty

Not That Kind of Royalty By Lea Page   |  April 26, 2021
“So, you lost your crown,” the dentist says. “Yes,” I reply. “Down the hatch.” I’ve learned that jokes are the best and maybe only antidote to terror. My daughter often reminds me, “Don’t relive past traumas,” so I won’t describe the horror show of dental malfeasance that got me here. Not to the dentist’s chair—that’s simple: I swallowed a crown while eating a bowl of leftover rice. Here being: imploding dread, the body’s memory of pain.

Resonance

Resonance By Nancy Jorgensen   |  April 19, 2021
A fifty-something woman, wearing a faded floral dress, showed me the antique pump organ. “No one plays anymore,” she said, her wooden cooking spoon in hand. “And I could use the $150.” She went back to her farmhouse stove to stir a pot that smelled of onion and sage while my new husband and I—some said too young for marriage at only 22—whispered about the price.

"Terrible Sanity" and the Art of Narrative

By Jake Demers   |  April 15, 2021
In “Terrible Sanity” (20.2), Sam Pickering wanders through his own life, lamenting the present and celebrating the past.
Keywords: 20.2

River Teeth Journal Issue 22.2

River Teeth Journal Issue 22.2 April 13, 2021
River Teeth 22.2 features the writing of: Abigail Thomas, Marianne Jay Erhardt, Greg Bottoms, Nicole Graev Lipson, Richard Goodman, Shamecca Harris, James Brown, Emily Waples, Jason Goldsmith, Jessica Franken, and Rick Rees.
Keywords: 22-2

Editor's Notes 22.2

Editor's Notes 22.2 By Joe Mackall   |  April 13, 2021
Before writing these editor’s notes on a cold Saturday morning in mid-November 2020, I thought back to the words penned in the editor’s notes of the previous issue by my friend and co-editor Dan Lehman, with the country and the world in the early days of the pandemic.
Keywords: 22-2

Urn

Urn By Jenny Apostol   |  April 12, 2021
“What kind of urn do you have in mind?” “No need,” I tell the funeral director. “My mother was a potter.” In the brownstone where I grew up, mother stashed a potter’s wheel behind a Japanese screen built by my father. When she wasn’t throwing pots, I rode that wheel like a merry-go-round.

Seasonal

Seasonal By Laura Marshall   |  April 5, 2021
In the fall, we rake pecans into piles as most people do with leaves. The tree’s branches extend in every direction over our backyard. Summer thunderstorms shake them loose unripened and encased in a rubbery green skin. They hit the roof with a sharp block, a Louisiana hail.

Walter M. Robinson Wins River Teeth's 2020 Literary Nonfiction Book Prize

Walter M. Robinson Wins River Teeth's 2020 Literary Nonfiction Book Prize By Walter M. Robinson   |  April 2, 2021
We are delighted to announce that Walter M. Robinson is the winner of River Teeth's 2020 Literary Nonfiction Book Prize. His winning manuscript, What Cannot Be Undone, will be published by the University of New Mexico Press in Spring 2022.

Exorcising, Freeing, and Healing Trauma

Exorcising, Freeing, and Healing Trauma By Krystal Sierra   |  April 2, 2021
Extreme. That’s one way to describe David Tromblay’s As You Were. Another way is horrific. A memoir that speaks to American Indian art, culture, history, and tradition, is not this one. Instead, Tromblay’s is a discovery of self only after he has lived to tell the tale, centering his trauma and survival as explicit indicators of his character.
Keywords: book review

James Brown

March 30, 2021
James Brown is the author of several books, including the memoirs Apology to the Young Addict and The Los Angeles Diaries.
Keywords: 22-2

Mist

Mist By Courtney Hill Gulbro   |  March 29, 2021
A wisp of perfume accompanied my mother. Like her, it was elegant and subtle. The fragrance softly followed her up the hall, her heels clicking, her skirt rustling. Late to somewhere.

The Bends of the Kickapoo

The Bends of the Kickapoo By Craig Holt Segall   |  March 22, 2021
The Kickapoo doubles back on itself. Cutting its way through the billion-year old hummocks of the Driftless Region, the river winds in tight knots and bends. In the high blue Wisconsin summers, ferns and orchids grow on the banded cliffs above the water.

Anchoring and Questioning: Tracing Research and Reflection in Leonard Winograd’s “The Physics of Sorrow”

 Anchoring and Questioning: Tracing Research and Reflection  in Leonard Winograd’s “The Physics of Sorrow” By Jessie Ferree   |  March 16, 2021
Leonard Winograd’s essay “The Physics of Sorrow,” found in River Teeth 21.1, provides a perfect example of the proper roles of research and reflective questioning.
Keywords: 21.1

This is Orange

This is Orange By Jill Kolongowski   |  March 15, 2021
Around 10:30 this morning the world is orange. The sky, the houses, the air. Inside, my new baby is trying to roll over. She wants to do it so badly she tries to do it in her crib instead of sleeping. She is hopeful. She is determined.

Red Talisman

Red Talisman By Christina Rivera Cogswell   |  March 8, 2021
In sepia photos of the flower market, I picture my father with bundles of pearl chrysanthemums or peach carnations in his brown boy arms. A child with the lodgepole-spine of knowing pride can mean the difference between survival or not under the street-corner eyes of the City of Angels.

Shamecca Harris

March 4, 2021
Shamecca Harris is a New York-based creative writer and teaching artist.
Keywords: 22-2

Emily Waples

March 4, 2021
Emily Waples lives in Northeast Ohio, where she is Assistant Professor of Biomedical Humanities and Director of the Center for Literature and Medicine at Hiram College.
Keywords: 22-2

Greg Bottoms

March 4, 2021
Greg Bottoms is an essayist and story writer. He is the author of two memoirs, Lowest White Boy (2019) and Angelhead (2000), an Esquire Magazine "Book of the Year"; two books of essays about American outsider artists, The Colorful Apocalypse (2007) and Spiritual American Trash (2013); and four prose collections, Sentimental, Heartbroken Rednecks (2001), Fight Scenes (2008), Swallowing the Past (2011), and Pitiful Criminals (2014).
Keywords: 22-2

Nicole Graev Lipson

March 4, 2021
Nicole Graev Lipson's essays and journalism have appeared in Creative Nonfiction, The Hudson Review, Hippocampus, Crab Creek Review, The Washington Post, and The Boston Globe, among other publications.
Keywords: 22-2

Newsletter Sign Up

shadow shadow