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The Band Reunited and We All Bought Tickets

The Band Reunited and We All Bought Tickets By Darlene Young   |  September 17, 2018
Praise God for a venue with a parking lot....

Vantage Point

Vantage Point By Donna Steiner   |  September 10, 2018
Some boys found a little brown bat in the parking lot outside the surgeon's office. Delicate as a tea bag, they poked it with a stick, kicked it....

A Grandmother Listens

A Grandmother Listens By Gail Hosking   |  September 3, 2018
She is a bird in song with whole consonants flying out of the cave of her tiny mouth, the tones airborne like a floating leaf. She hands me a block, and with it comes language not yet molded into comprehension, but so sweet, that I listen carefully like one does on a forest walk....

A Failing Body Summons a Restless Mind: A Polio Memoir

A Failing Body Summons a Restless Mind: A Polio Memoir By Katharine Coldiron   |  September 1, 2018
Sandra Gail Lambert is not interested in being anyone's inspiration. If this review called her memoir in essays, A Certain Loneliness, inspiring, the author would recoil....

2016 Book Prize Winner a Finalist in WILLA Literary Awards

2016 Book Prize Winner a Finalist in WILLA Literary Awards August 30, 2018
Earlier this month Women Writing the West (WWW) announced the 2018 WILLA Literary Award Winners and Finalists. The 2016 River Teeth book prize winner, Rough Crossing: An Alaskan Fisherwoman’s Memoir by Rosemary McGuire, was one of two finalists in the category of Creative Nonfiction.
Keywords: book prize, contest

A Total Solar Eclipse Is Visible from Any Given Point on Earth Once Every 375 Years, on Average

A Total Solar Eclipse Is Visible from Any Given Point on Earth Once Every 375 Years, on Average By Catherine Pierce   |  August 27, 2018
We'd gone to the lake to watch. We had the special glasses, and I toggled between gaping at the razor-precise disappearing of the sun and looking down at my children to make sure they both had their glasses properly affixed.

Away and Away, Then To: A Memoir

Away and Away, Then To: A Memoir By Susan Rukeyser   |  August 20, 2018
The placenta blocked my exit. I was lifted from my mother just in time. London, 1968—bound for my father's USA. The month between Martin and Bobby; I imagine everyone sad.

In Answer to Fire

In Answer to Fire By Maya Khosla   |  August 13, 2018
For a long time, we could not go back. But once we were done averting our eyes, once we had mourned and banished all smoldering thoughts about the tribe of blackened trees replacing the known world for now and another season, and the last long fingers of smoke were ushered out by wind, a ticking began....

Walking

Walking By Jia Lim   |  August 6, 2018
I do not want to be naked. The thought consumes me to the point of obsession. As we crunch across the luminous blue-gray glacier, as we delicately spear a rack of the best lamb I've ever had in my life, as we drive for hours in the liquid darkness searching for the northern lights, my mind churns over scenarios....

One Reader's Homage to Two Dogeared Authors

One Reader's Homage to Two Dogeared Authors By Robert Root   |  August 1, 2018
The next time you stop by my house, ask to see my copy of Patricia Hampl's The Art of the Wasted Day, her most recent book. You may not know that long ago, feeling guilty about writing in the margins of books, I began dogearing pages where the author wrote something I hoped to remember....

Visitation (rerun)

Visitation (rerun) By Kelsey E. Moore   |  July 30, 2018
On the porch, under a Blood Moon, our fire is dying down, so we wear wool blankets over our shoulders. We're drinking cider warmed in a pan on the stove, splashed into mugs with whiskey....

Interruptions (rerun)

Interruptions (rerun) By Sheldon Lawrence   |  July 23, 2018
Seek stillness. Close your eyes, relax in the lotus position, and breathe deeply. But hold on tight. Search every corner of the cosmos and you find only a universe in motion....

Waiting for Owls (rerun)

Waiting for Owls (rerun) By Mark Liebenow   |  July 16, 2018
Evening returns to the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and the land cools. Day follows the sun across the valley floor and up into the mountains in the west. Birds settle down for the night.

The Sweetness of Figs

The Sweetness of Figs By Lisa Reily   |  July 9, 2018
I am at home here like I have not been anywhere else in my life. Home in the heat of dripping fig trees, their treacle tears that drop-by-drop onto the dry ground, the sour smell of wine in the air....

Excalibur

Excalibur By Jessica Gigot   |  July 2, 2018
We sprinted by the worn house with the closed blinds that reeked of pot and who knows what else. I gave the leash a short tug and we slowed to a walk again....

A Mother's Tale, An Enabled Son, The Damage Done

A Mother's Tale, An Enabled Son, The Damage Done By David MacWilliams   |  July 1, 2018
Meg McGuire's memoir explores addiction, mental disorder, denial, guilt, and the destructive effects of a parent's love....

Mail Order

Mail Order By Ksenia Panova   |  June 25, 2018
You know what I heard, I heard your mother was a mail order briiiiiiide. The girl with a thoroughly sensible name in my first-grade class drew out the last word, and I struggled with the new sentence structure....

Leave-Taking

Leave-Taking By Chris Erickson   |  June 18, 2018
Sassafras, shagbark hickory, spicebush, paw paws and sycamores marked the descent to the creek. The untillable acres, as they call them. The hills too steep and outcrops too rocky. The forgotten backs of farms....

The Petals of Summer

The Petals of Summer By Marybeth Holleman   |  June 11, 2018
They lie like bits of tissue on the bathroom floor rug, caught in the fibers; I bend to pick them up and see the yellow and pink threadworn veins, dry and broken and translucent pieces of geranium and nasturtium....

This Is What Men Do

This Is What Men Do By Diana Rico   |  June 4, 2018
At the tiny Eretz Shalom Cemetery on the mesa south of Taos, I feel like I have stepped into a John Ford Western. The impossibly big New Mexican sky dwarfs the mourners standing in sagebrush around a six-foot-deep hole in the ground....

Rooted and Reaching

Rooted and Reaching By Sarah Wells   |  June 1, 2018
My yoga instructor calls it “rooted and reaching,” that connection between the earthly and the sacred. I am here, even though somewhere in the past, if you’d asked me to shift into downward dog, I would have warned of some foreign demon taking residence in this Christ-saved jar of clay....

Wish You Were Here

Wish You Were Here By Sunni Wilkinson   |  May 28, 2018
Our three-year-old sits on my husband's shoulders, bouncing. Red rock and yellow cottonwood trees and blue sky surround us. Fall break in Capitol Reef, Utah, and we’re winding up a trail we’ve never hiked before to see an arch...

Tell Me

Tell Me By Denise Wilkinson   |  May 21, 2018
Show me the shape of your thoughts when the doctor announced my cancer. Reveal the colors and the shadows. Tell me not the lines, but the in-betweens, right to your bones. Lament with me the unrest of memories yet to be lived, then speak them...

The River and How She Heals

The River and How She Heals By Amber D. Stoner   |  May 14, 2018
When the house went cold - not the oxygen and nitrogen, but the mood, the atmosphere around my parents - when that froze into stasis, into wariness, into step-lightly-quietly-invisibly, I would retreat outside where I could breathe without...

The Dancer

The Dancer By Jan McGuire   |  May 7, 2018
Mom danced with The Dancing Divas - women in their seventies proudly performing in over thirty elaborate costumes. Accessories included a Fedora with a plastic mafia machine gun, a red suitcase doubling as a small platform for tapping to...

River Teeth Journal Issue 19.2

River Teeth Journal Issue 19.2 May 2, 2018
This issue features work by Suzanne Roberts, Heather M. Surls, Thomas Larson, Wendy Bone, Anton DiSclafani, Mark Beaver, Jill Christman, Bonnie Ilza Cisneros, Carol D. Marsh, Emily Sinclair, Alia Volz, and Tom Montgomery Fate.
Keywords: 19-2

Art and National Identity

Art and National Identity By Doug Rutledge   |  May 2, 2018
As her title confirms, Vigderman’s primary concern is the Parthenon. The history she offers of this culturally significant site is enlightening.

Guavas

Guavas By A. Mauricio Ruiz   |  April 30, 2018
This morning I went out to the garden with my mom and picked up guavas, tiny yellow pieces of fruit that had fallen from the tree and now lay scattered on the ground. I bent over and picked them up, one by one, thought of the time when there was only...

Wrinkles

Wrinkles By Valerie White   |  April 23, 2018
They surround her eyes, her nose, and her mouth. She likes to touch them, to run her fingers over them, to try and count them, although it is nearly impossible to see where each one starts and ends. Each wrinkle seemed to appear with a major...

River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize Winner

River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize Winner April 20, 2018
We're proud to announce the winner of this 2017's River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize: Debra Gwartney, with her piece "I Am A Stranger Here Myself."

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