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Where Have All the Overmedicated Mermaids Gone?

Where Have All the Overmedicated Mermaids Gone? By Samir Atassi   |  April 6, 2015
Elissa Washuta’s memoir is a twisting, chameleon-like work of reportage, highly poetic at times, showing how cultural forces and tragic events have left their tracks on her body and mind. The search “for an identity to sink into” in a savage, selfish world is at the heart of this book.

Podcast Interview with Brandon Sneed

Podcast Interview with Brandon Sneed By Matt Tullis   |  March 19, 2015
Brandon Sneed wrote the book "Behind the Drive: A Story of Passion, Dreams, Demons, and Highway 55, the World's Next Favorite Burger Joint."

A Son Coming Home

A Son Coming Home By Virginia Taylor   |  March 1, 2015
Steven Harvey, in his marvelous memoir, The Book of Knowledge and Wonder, is on a journey to discover and understand his mother who committed suicide in April, 1961, when Harvey was eleven years old. Reflecting on her act, Harvey observes that it “had exploded in my life like the flash of a camera at close range, darkening everything around me and casting me into blindness, and when the light returned she was gone. . . . "

Editor's Notes, Volume 16, Number 2

Editor's Notes, Volume 16, Number 2 February 26, 2015
The title character of Heckert’s piece—flinty, cantankerous, desperately ill—simply refuses to do what we expect of her, either as a literary character or as a real person. And, as River Teeth readers know, it is the knife’s edge between those worlds that endlessly worries and fascinates us.
Keywords: 16-2, editors notes

Which Way Next?

Which Way Next? By David MacWilliams   |  February 1, 2015
In his brief essay, “Dead Weight,” Eric Freeze describes a walk he takes with his dog, Zeke, a walk that ends horribly. He sees a police cruiser descending a hill, his Dalmatian blundering into its path, and there’s nothing he can do but shout and witness the inevitable. This scene reveals a tension that runs through many of the fifteen essays in his first collection of essays, Hemingway on a Bike: the threat of lurking disaster in the most peaceful of moments versus the potential in such moments for sudden and wonderful insight.

Podcast Interview with David Giffels

Podcast Interview with David Giffels By Matt Tullis   |  January 28, 2015
In this episode of Gangrey: The Podcast, Matt Tullis talks with David Giffels, former newspaper reporter and author of the book, The Hard Way on Purpose: Essays and Dispatches from the Rust Belt.

A Beautiful Savage Game

A Beautiful Savage Game By Amber D. Stoner   |  January 7, 2015
After forty years of watching the game, playing fantasy football, and mourning yet another Oakland Raiders’ loss, Almond no longer indulges his love of watching football and his latest book, Against Football: One Fan’s Reluctant Manifesto, explains why.

The Infinitely Unending Art of Judith Kitchen

The Infinitely Unending Art of Judith Kitchen By Marilyn Bousquin   |  December 1, 2014
Judith Kitchen, writer, editor, critic, and teacher, died at the age of 73 on November 6, 2014, after living with metastasized breast cancer, the subject of The Circus Train. I choose the word “living” deliberately because Kitchen’s presence—her aliveness on the page—is a swirling force behind many memorable passages in the book...

Podcast Interview with Vanessa Grigoriadis

Podcast Interview with Vanessa Grigoriadis By Matt Tullis   |  November 19, 2014
In this episode of Gangrey: The Podcast, Matt Tullis talks with Vanessa Grigoriadis, an award winning contributor for national magazines. She talks about pop culture, journalistic research and some of her recent articles.

Raise High the Roof Beam, Women Authors

Raise High the Roof Beam, Women Authors By Josette Kubaszyk   |  November 3, 2014
Since its inception, Shebooks’ digital collection of downloadable fiction, memoir, and journalism has grown to over 70 books, each of which the publishers say can be read “in an hour or two.” Their library is composed of works by both new and established writers. We review three selections in this month's book review.

Podcast Interview with Earl Swift

Podcast Interview with Earl Swift By Matt Tullis   |  October 27, 2014
In this episode of Gangrey: The Podcast, Matt Tullis talks with Earl Swift, the author of Auto Biography: A Classic Car, An Outlaw Motorhead, and 57 Years of the American Dream. The book tells the life story of a 1957 Chevy that, at the beginning of the book, is falling apart.

To the Body Born

To the Body Born By Jan Shoemaker   |  October 1, 2014
“I started my martial arts training on the day the Gulf War began,” Peggy Shinner recalls. It was a discipline she would go on to master and teach. Moving across the page in her essay collection, You Feel So Mortal, with the same agility she took to the polished wood of the dojo floor, Shinner explores the flesh and blood experience—hers and ours—of having a body.

Podcast Interview with Eli Saslow

Podcast Interview with Eli Saslow By Matt Tullis   |  September 11, 2014
Eli Saslow is a reporter at the Washington Post. Earlier this year, he won the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting for his series of stories on food stamps in a post-recession America.

The Nothing That Is Not There and the Nothing That Is

The Nothing That Is Not There and the Nothing That Is By Doug Rutledge   |  September 3, 2014
In Praise of Nothing is both an interesting and a frustrating book. It’s interesting in its attempt to write a postmodern memoir. It’s frustrating, however, because it does not fulfill the reader’s conventional expectations of coherence and meaning. Postmodern thinkers, such as Roland Barthes, are highly skeptical of the idea of human agency and would also doubt the coherence of the self. They believe the idea that a human being who is a psychologically whole and stable person is largely fictionalized. Therefore, LeMay has written an unstable memoir.

Editor's Notes, Volume 16, Number 1

Editor's Notes, Volume 16, Number 1 By Joe Mackall   |  August 28, 2014
We at River Teeth talk a lot about what the journal has meant to us during our first fifteen years. What we’ve discovered doesn’t surprise us now, but it would have fifteen years ago. It’s the people: the people we’ve met, the people we’ve published, the people who came of age as creative nonfiction writers reading River Teeth. It’s all pretty damn humbling, to be sure.

Essaying a Spinning World

Essaying a Spinning World By Robert Root   |  August 1, 2014
Much of what Skloot deems "off-kilter" seems the kind of emotional imbalance with which we can all identify.

The Inner World of Caregiving

The Inner World of Caregiving By Jennifer Ochstein   |  July 1, 2014
If caregiving was a compass and sainthood was at zero degrees north, The Fifth Season would orient us due south.

Going Long, It's Tense, Research, Getting Connected, Reflection, Naming and more from #RTNC2014

Going Long, It's Tense, Research, Getting Connected, Reflection, Naming and more from #RTNC2014 June 27, 2014
Snippets, snapshots, and video from the River Teeth Nonfiction Conference

Growing the Soil and the Soul: On Richard Gilbert's SHEPHERD

Growing the Soil and the Soul: On Richard Gilbert's SHEPHERD By Thomas Larson   |  June 1, 2014
Sometimes a memoir, spilling into the ken of autobiography, must grapple with an author’s lifelong enigma—his book’s story, the story. As we read, we feel this cyclonic summing-up, the best chance after the life (or as far as the life has got) to say what, in particular, shaped that life’s core meaning. Perhaps the revelation is that we don’t get another go-round (obvious but important), that we never knew the storm was gathering while it happened (as much good as bad), and that the life we thought we lived was not exactly the one we did live (the new self the memoir discloses to its surprised narrator). Such is the case with Richard Gilbert’s book, Shepherd.

Why We're Here: Third Annual River Teeth Nonfiction Conference

Why We're Here: Third Annual River Teeth Nonfiction Conference By Sarah Wells   |  May 22, 2014
For as intimate and vulnerable as the writing process is, the process of sending my work out into the world for possible publication feels like the most distant and impersonal interaction there is between writer and reader. And yet, what is publishing our words except engaging in a broader conversation, contributing one voice to a river of voices?

Podcast Interview with Jackie Valley

Podcast Interview with Jackie Valley By Matt Tullis   |  April 24, 2014
Jackie Valley is a reporter at the Las Vegas Sun. Just about one year ago, she published a seven-part series called “Grace Through Grief.” The series followed Arturo Martinez and his two young sons as they dealt with the brutal murder of their wife and daughter, their mother and sister.

Podcast Interview with Eva Holland

Podcast Interview with Eva Holland By Matt Tullis   |  April 17, 2014
Eva Holland's story "Chasing Alexander Supertramp" looks at the increasing number of people who make the pilgrimage to the bus where Christopher McCandless of Into the Wild Fame died. The hike to that bus includes a dangerous crossing of the Teklanika River in Alaska, and continues to strand hikers on a regular basis, and sometimes claim lives.

Podcast Interview with Ben Montgomery

Podcast Interview with Ben Montgomery By Matt Tullis   |  April 9, 2014
In this podcast, Matt Tullis talks with Ben Montgomery, enterprise reporter at the Tampa Bay Times and the author of Grandma Gatewood’s Walk: The Inspiring Story of the Woman Who Saved the Appalachian Trail.

Podcast Interview with Wil S. Hylton

Podcast Interview with Wil S. Hylton By Matt Tullis   |  March 13, 2014
Wil S. Hylton is the author of Vanished, about the modern-day search for one American bomber that crashed over the Pacific Islands during World War II. He is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, and his work has been featured in Harpers, GQ, Esquire and Rolling Stone, among many others magazines.

Podcast Interview with Mike Sager

Podcast Interview with Mike Sager By Matt Tullis   |  February 17, 2014
Mike Sager is a bestselling author and award-winning reporter who has been called the beat poet of American journalism.

Editor's Notes Volume 15 Number 2

Editor's Notes Volume 15 Number 2 By Dan Lehman   |  January 29, 2014
...We prowl for edgy, compelling nonfiction, crafting volumes that regularly make our readers take an extra breath and blink....

Podcast with Chris Jones

Podcast with Chris Jones By Matt Tullis   |  January 22, 2014
On the most recent Gangrey: The Podcast, Matt Tullis interviews Chris Jones, writer-at-large for Esquire and back-page columnist for ESPN The Magazine.

28 Days of Beautiful Things

28 Days of Beautiful Things January 15, 2014
In the month of February, River Teeth will feature excerpts from Michelle Webster-Hein's essay, "Beautiful Things," which appeared in River Teeth 15.1.

Podcast with Michael Kruse

Podcast with Michael Kruse By Matt Tullis   |  January 7, 2014
On the most recent Gangrey: The Podcast, Matt Tullis talks with Michael Kruse, staff writer on the enterprise team at the Tampa Bay Times about his three-part series titled "The Last Voyage of the Bounty."

The Stealth Memoir: Writing Your Life Between the Lines

The Stealth Memoir: Writing Your Life Between the Lines November 26, 2013
In this presentation from the 2013 River Teeth Nonfiction Conference, Michelle Herman discusses "The Stealth Memoir: Writing Your Life Between the Lines," a conversation about combining your personal narrative with subject matter beyond your immediate life story.

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