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Pawpaws

Pawpaws By Kelly Zanotti   |  April 27, 2020
Pedro is quiet as we walk, and is still quiet when we stop to rest on a rock where above us pawpaws hang overripe like clean green hearts.

Marco Polo in Missoula

Marco Polo in Missoula By Emily Withnall   |  April 20, 2020
My house is leaky. Wisps of cold air seep in – but my kids remind me this isn't possible, that scientifically the warm air is leaking out. Certainly, there is oxygen flow in this old creaky house but taking a full breath is a privilege I don't use . . .

"Almost Thirty" by Rachel Weaver: A Balancing Act in Narrative Rhythm

By Rebekah Hoffer   |  April 15, 2020
One of the most important lessons I’ve learned in writing creative nonfiction is that, when in doubt, sometimes the best way to write about a thing is to write about something else entirely. Rachel Weaver uses this technique to great effect in her essay, "Almost Thirty" (River Teeth, Volume 20, Number 2, Spring 2019)—one of my favorites of the essays I’ve recently read.
Keywords: 20.2

These Italian Pastries

These Italian Pastries By Amy Suardi   |  April 13, 2020
These Italian pastries were decorated by an 87-year-old woman in a drawn-out process involving almond paste and mandarin oranges. I bought them at a cliffside stand in a cellophane bag tied with red curling ribbon on the Sicilian island of Lipari.

Allusion as Structure in Sean Ironman’s “And I Will Give You As Many Roast Bones As You Need”

Allusion as Structure in Sean Ironman’s  “And I Will Give You As Many Roast Bones As You Need” By Jonah James   |  April 8, 2020
Sean Ironman’s essay, “And I Will Give You As Many Roast Bones As You Need”(River Teeth, Volume 21, Number 1, Fall 2019)—is the longest essay in River Teeth 21.1, and in the same way its name winds and wends, so too does the essay, bridging memory and history and theory together to form one long road that leads its way through the many ways humans and dogs have loved each other and lived together over the years.
Keywords: 21.1

Beneath

Beneath By Laura Stott   |  April 6, 2020
Think about the spirit of an animal that could occupy a house this big – the whale. There goes my first born, gliding past me at the pool with her dad in a man-made river, smiling and carrying the sun like she was born to do. . .

A Tragic History. Its Legacy Still Troubled.

A Tragic History. Its Legacy Still Troubled. By Richard Goodman   |  April 1, 2020
Imagine my delight in finding that Siberian Exile, by Julija Šukys, about the search for her grandparents’ past, weighs in at a mere 166 pages. What I didn’t know was that even in such a brief book about her grandparents’ fates in war-torn Lithuania and Siberia, there is a Gordian knot of drama, pain, loss, and speculation. I don’t think 166 pages can be more complex than they are in Siberian Exile. This is both exciting, enlightening, harrowing, and frustrating for the reader.

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