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Beginning of Spring

Beginning of Spring By Leanne Ogasawara   |  March 30, 2020
The Chinese calendar had it right. Insisting that spring begins in February is to begin a season at the beginning, when the season is only just awakening, a quiet stirring.

In the Car She Drives, the Air is Always Fresh(ened)

In the Car She Drives, the Air is Always Fresh(ened) By Carla Panciera   |  March 23, 2020
A cardboard pine tree of Caribbean Colada swings from the rearview mirror, the mirror in which my daughter considers whether she needs eyelash extensions, teeth whitening. Whether she needs her eyebrows threaded. Onto the vents, she's clipped mini-clothespins...

How Do They Find Me?

How Do They Find Me? By Donna Steiner   |  March 16, 2020
My mother's greatest pleasure since her stroke is to sit in the courtyard of the rehab center. It's not a beautiful space, just a square of concrete surrounded by high walls. If she could lean her head back, she could see the sky.

The Delicacy

The Delicacy By John Yu Branscum & Yi Izzy Yu   |  March 9, 2020
The "Eight Mountain Delicacies" are among the most sought after dishes from the Imperial Banquet of 1720, but they are nearly impossible to make. Some of the more exotic ingredients, such as leopard fetuses, are unobtainable . . .

Nesting

Nesting By Erin Wood   |  March 2, 2020
After the very worst winter, spring pushes back the smell of antiseptic, the taste of iron, the pain of useless milk, and fills the air with the green aroma of life once more. It draws me out again, bare feet in cool grass blades . . .

Their Home Is Not Here

Their Home Is Not Here By Lindsay Hickman   |  March 2, 2020
The Ungrateful Refugee is a perfect title; readers may feel Nayeri’s inner demons waging a war of gratefulness for the endless opportunities her citizenship in the United States has brought her as well as for the memories, roots, and customs her new status has taken away, particularly a close relationship with her father in Iran.
Keywords: book review

Another Workday

Another Workday By Robert Erle Barham   |  February 24, 2020
"Daddy, are you going to work?" my son asks when he sees me wearing a jacket and tie before I leave for campus and a day of teaching. Years ago my father's work boots and overalls prompted the same question from me. . .

My Sister Passes Me on a Bench at the Zoo

My Sister Passes Me on a Bench at the Zoo By Misty Urban   |  February 17, 2020
On a bench in the zoo a girl walks past me wearing my sister’s face—my sister’s smooth, pre-teen face, before acne, before irony, before the long humped shuffle of illness.

Picking Up Lint

Picking Up Lint By Mary Potter   |  February 10, 2020
My dad was an exacting man. When he ran a motor assembly plant in Belgium, he plastered the shop floor, break rooms, and bathrooms with signs that urge-warned in Flemish, WHAT YOU DO, DO IT RIGHT! At home he was equally demanding.

Make Present the Experience of the Other: Three Memoirs of Political Witness

Make Present the Experience of the Other: Three Memoirs of Political Witness By Glen Retief   |  February 9, 2020
Memoir has, of course, never carried the cachet of poetry. Yet like the poetry or fiction of witness, the outward-looking, politically engaged memoir and essay have a rich and respected literary pedigree, including slave narratives (the predominant form of African-American literature until the twentieth century); Mark Twain’s pamphlet about the genocide in the Congo Free State; James Baldwin’s and George Orwell’s searing dissections of racism and colonialism; Ivan Turgenev’s descriptions of Jean-Baptiste Tropmann’s execution; and Mary McCarthy’s brilliant denunciations of American Stalinism, to name just a few.

River Teeth Journal Issue 21.1

River Teeth Journal Issue 21.1 February 7, 2020
River Teeth Issue 21.1 features the writing of Jan Shoemaker, Sean Ironman, Lawrence Lenhart, Laurie Uttich, Leonard Winograd, Nicholas Dighiera, Molly Gallentine, Beth Ann Miller, Stephen D. Gutierrez, Susan H. Greenberg, and Noah Davis.

Eulogy for a Dog with Sad Eyes

Eulogy for a Dog with Sad Eyes By Margaret Emma Brandl   |  February 3, 2020
You were always underfoot, in fibers of the carpet, your big shape blocking doorways and chair-paths until you decided on your own where to go. You shook when there were fireworks, you barked when we got locked out, you smiled up at the camera...

Noah Davis

January 31, 2020
Noah Davis grew up in Tipton, Pennsylvania, and writes about the Allegheny Front.
Keywords: 21-1

Nicholas Dighiera

January 31, 2020
Nick is a meat machine that is animated by electrical signals that originated from a fat computer that, subsequently, received its guidance from a melange of powerful chemicals necessary for survival amongst mammoths and short-faced bears.
Keywords: 21-1

Molly Gallentine

January 31, 2020
Molly Gallentine's nonfiction has appeared in publications such as The Wall Street Journal, Fourth Genre, and The Normal School, and is forthcoming in The New England Review. Her work can also be found in The Pushcart Prize Anthology XLIII.
Keywords: 21-1

Susan H. Greenberg

January 31, 2020
Susan H. Greenberg is a journalist and essayist who teaches writing at Middlebury College. She spent 22 years at Newsweek magazine, and has also written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Atlantic, among others.
Keywords: 21-1

Stephen D. Gutierrez

January 31, 2020
Stephen D. Gutierrez is the author of Live from Fresno y Los, which won an American Book Award, and The Mexican Man in His Backyard.
Keywords: 21-1

Sean Ironman

January 31, 2020
Sean Ironman’s nonfiction and comics have appeared in Fourth Genre, Redivider, Nashville Review, and Salt Hill, among others.
Keywords: 21-1

Editor's Notes 21.1

Editor's Notes 21.1 By Joe Mackall   |  January 31, 2020
The other day I had occasion to drive through a town named Red Haw, just a few miles from my home in rural Ohio. I live in a small community, but it’s a booming metropolis compared to Red Haw, a town of Trump re-election signs, a smattering of houses, a few barns, and a Methodist church. Red Haw is an easy place to ignore, and it’s an even easier place to think you know.
Keywords: 21-1

Leonard Winograd

January 31, 2020
You can find Leonard Winograd's work nowhere. He's the author of no books and while he's written plays, none has ever been professionally performed.
Keywords: 21-1

Laurie Uttich

January 31, 2020
Laurie Uttich's prose and poetry have been published in Fourth Genre, Creative Nonfiction, Rattle, The Missouri Review, Superstition Review, Sweet, and others.
Keywords: 21-1

Jan Shoemaker

January 31, 2020
Jan Shoemaker is the author of the essay collection, Flesh and Stones: Field Notes from a Finite World, and the poetry collection, The Reliquary Earth.
Keywords: 21-1

Beth Ann Miller

January 31, 2020
Beth Ann Miller is an Assistant Professor in Humanities at New England College and Guest Fiction Editor at the Saranac Review. Her fiction and creative nonfiction have appeared in journals such as The Normal School, PANK, and The Northern New England Review.
Keywords: 21-1

Lawrence Lenhart

January 31, 2020
Lawrence Lenhart studied writing at the University of Pittsburgh and holds an MFA from the University of Arizona. He is the author of The Well-Stocked and Gilded Cage (Outpost19), Of No Ground: Small Island/Big Ocean Contingencies (West Virginia University Press), and a book-length essay bout the reintroduction of the black-footed ferret to the Colorado Plateau.
Keywords: 21-1

Nails

Nails By Kristine Crane   |  January 27, 2020
My mother’s fingernails were sculpted and strong—not like salon nails, more like the backs of beetles. Every Saturday night she’d paint them for Mass the next day—usually deep red, her favorite color.

Atlantis

Atlantis By Angie Crea O'Neal   |  January 20, 2020
"Because, what if they don't turn out okay?" The question, posed by my 14-year old daughter, hung in the air as we drove past the park after school late one afternoon. I was talking about motherhood, and she matter-of-factly justified her plan...

Jasmine

Jasmine By Leah Christianson   |  January 13, 2020
He's outside, singing. On the record player, Sinatra spins. Next, it will be Pavarotti. Maybe a big-band soundtrack. Whatever the treasure, he will make a big show of dusting off and placing a needle upon before heading back to his garden.

Home to Roost

Home to Roost By Vivian Wagner   |  January 6, 2020
I liked the hens, with their kind eyes and soft, red feathers. I was seven, and I wanted to sleep with them, to nestle with them, because they felt like a dozen mothers, all watching out for me.

Michael Steinberg: A Remembrance and a Review

Michael Steinberg: A Remembrance and a Review By Thomas Larson   |  January 3, 2020
In December 2019, in a country torn apart by Donald Trump’s bullying and Fox News’ Pravda-like misinformation, in congressional hearings that traded in the ridiculous and the profound, in a democracy under such partisan assault it seemed to buckle before our eyes, and in the month of Trump’s impeachment, we were hit with grave news of another sort: creative nonfiction’s (and my) beloved colleague, mentor, and friend, Mike Steinberg, 79, died from pancreatic cancer, undiscovered until a week before he passed.
Keywords: book review

Here. Look.

Here. Look. By Ona Gritz   |  December 30, 2019
My husband hadn't meant to render us in silhouette. He was a novice, the camera new and heavy in his hands. As we gazed out the window he didn't realize that by aiming toward it, into the sun, he'd cast us in shadow, erasing specifics.

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