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River Teeth is a biannual journal combining the best of creative nonfiction, including narrative reportage, essays and memoir, with critical essays that examine the emerging genre and that explore the impact of nonfiction narrative on the lives of its writers, subjects, and readers.


Latest News

Robert Lunday Wins River Teeth's 2021 Literary Nonfiction Book Prize

We are delighted to announce that Robert Lunday has won the 2021 River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Book Prize. Fayettenam: Meditations on Missingness will be published by the University of New Mexico Press in spring 2023. All entries were screened by t...more

Walter M. Robinson Wins River Teeth's 2020 Literary Nonfiction Book Prize

We are delighted to announce that Walter M. Robinson is the winner of River Teeth's 2020 Literary Nonfiction Book Prize. His winning manuscript, What Cannot Be Undone, will be published by the University of New Mexico Press in Spring 2022....more

Megan Stielstra To Judge the 2020 River Teeth Book Prize

We are delighted to announce that acclaimed author, Megan Stielstra will judge the 2020 River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Book Prize. ...more

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Beautiful Things

Things to do in the Belly of Despair

Things to do in the Belly of Despair

By Kerry Herlihy

May 16, 2022

Featured Articles

Whose Family Is It: Mine or My In-Laws?     

Whose Family Is It: Mine or My In-Laws?    

The themes of Kandel’s memoir are twofold. First, as a young married couple, she and Johan, her husband, must adapt not only to each other’s cultures—she is American, he is Dutch—as well as the unfamiliar cultures of people among whom they live and work in very different parts of the world. Second, she must deal with her inability to understand the personality of her father-in-law, Izaak, and the dominance he exerts over his wife and Kandel’s family....

Sonnet 29: Word for Word

Sonnet 29: Word for Word

The Fact of Memory is an unusual prose experiment. Using Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 29,” which begins with the famous line, “When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes,” the author Aaron Angello takes each word of the sonnet, 114 in total, and uses each word as a springboard for a short ruminative essay. ...

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