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River Teeth is a biannual journal combining the best of creative nonfiction, including narrative reportage, essays and memoir, with critical essays that examine the emerging genre and that explore the impact of nonfiction narrative on the lives of its writers, subjects, and readers.


Latest News

Megan Stielstra To Judge the 2020 River Teeth Book Prize

We are delighted to announce that acclaimed author, Megan Stielstra will judge the 2020 River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Book Prize. ...more

River Teeth part of a 4-journal CNF reading during Portland AWP Writers Conference

Join Under the Gum Tree, Fourth Genre, Hippocampus, and River Teeth for an AWP happy hour of telling true stories: Friday, March 29, 5:30-7 p.m. at the White Owl Social Club in Portland, OR. ...more

Essay Collection by Joan Frank Wins 2018 River Teeth Book Prize

Congratulations to Joan Frank, the winner of the 2018 River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Book Prize. Her winning manuscript Try to Get Lost: Essays on Travel and Place is focused, most broadly, upon travel and place--but also and equally, popular culture and, by default, autobiography....more

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Beautiful Things

Featured Articles

The Cadence of an Individual Heartbeat

The Cadence of an Individual Heartbeat

“I’ve always been a hungry reader,” Rebecca McClanahan writes in her newest collection In the Key of New York. Me too. And I often read as I eat: I gobble. But, as with certain transcendent meals, there are books that, from the first page, ask that I slow down and savor: hold the book carefully, turn the pages mindfully. McClanahan’s memoir-in-essays is just such a book. As I read, I found myself asking what qualities define writing that both enlivens and stills the reader....

Bathing (Again) at 9600 Feet

Bathing (Again) at 9600 Feet

Slow Arrow: Unearthing the Frail Children has a sub-subtitle that appears only on the title page: Essays from 9600 feet, an ascension to yet another layer, so Winograd. I will begin at that altitude, in the Colorado cabin Winograd built with her husband Leonard—who features frequently in these pages as voice of reason, asker of crucial questions (“Where are the bees?”), cracker of jokes, watcher of sky, and bearer of arachnid mercy in the form of an oft-used spider jar....

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