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River Teeth is a biannual journal combining the best of creative nonfiction, including narrative reportage, essays and memoir, with critical essays that examine the emerging genre and that explore the impact of nonfiction narrative on the lives of its writers, subjects, and readers.


Latest News

River Teeth part of a 4-journal CNF reading during Portland AWP Writers Conference

Join Under the Gum Tree, Fourth Genre, Hippocampus, and River Teeth for an AWP happy hour of telling true stories: Friday, March 29, 5:30-7 p.m. at the White Owl Social Club in Portland, OR. ...more

Essay Collection by Joan Frank Wins 2018 River Teeth Book Prize

Congratulations to Joan Frank, the winner of the 2018 River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Book Prize. Her winning manuscript Try to Get Lost: Essays on Travel and Place is focused, most broadly, upon travel and place--but also and equally, popular culture and, by default, autobiography....more

2016 Book Prize Winner a Finalist in WILLA Literary Awards

Earlier this month Women Writing the West (WWW) announced the 2018 WILLA Literary Award Winners and Finalists. The 2016 River Teeth book prize winner, Rough Crossing: An Alaskan Fisherwoman’s Memoir by Rosemary McGuire, was one of two finalists in the category of Creative Nonfiction. ...more

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Beautiful Things

Footfalls

Footfalls

By Andrea Marcusa

September 16, 2019

Featured Articles

One Word Says It All

One Word Says It All

Where—or what—is your hearth of hearths? Where is the place you feel most alive or connected? What is the thing that reminds you who you are and to what (or whom) you belong? In all the world, what do you call home? These are some of the questions that Annick Smith and Susan O’Connor pondered as they edited Hearth: A Global Conversation on Identity, Community, and Place....

Shapes Shifted, Senses Altered, Values Freely Wheeled

Shapes Shifted, Senses Altered, Values Freely Wheeled

There may be no more startling way to bait readers into an essay than this: “Is there a word for the unsettling sensation of sitting down on an unexpectedly warm toilet seat, because someone used it just before you and sat there for a good long while? Maybe something in German?” The author titles it: “FREUDENSCHANDE: PRIV(AC)Y,” that is “joyful-shame.” Using wilder “made-up” German compounds as section titles, she compares the “bowel mover” in the “public privy” to the commodious confessions of personal nonfiction, the emotional “shitshow” so many memoirists and essayists insist readers must sit with....

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