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River Teeth is a biannual journal combining the best of creative nonfiction, including narrative reportage, essays and memoir, with critical essays that examine the emerging genre and that explore the impact of nonfiction narrative on the lives of its writers, subjects, and readers.


Latest News

River Teeth part of a 4-journal CNF reading during Portland AWP Writers Conference

Join Under the Gum Tree, Fourth Genre, Hippocampus, and River Teeth for an AWP happy hour of telling true stories: Friday, March 29, 5:30-7 p.m. at the White Owl Social Club in Portland, OR. ...more

Essay Collection by Joan Frank Wins 2018 River Teeth Book Prize

Congratulations to Joan Frank, the winner of the 2018 River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Book Prize. Her winning manuscript Try to Get Lost: Essays on Travel and Place is focused, most broadly, upon travel and place--but also and equally, popular culture and, by default, autobiography....more

2016 Book Prize Winner a Finalist in WILLA Literary Awards

Earlier this month Women Writing the West (WWW) announced the 2018 WILLA Literary Award Winners and Finalists. The 2016 River Teeth book prize winner, Rough Crossing: An Alaskan Fisherwoman’s Memoir by Rosemary McGuire, was one of two finalists in the category of Creative Nonfiction. ...more

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Beautiful Things

Those Days

Those Days

By Nikki Hardin

July 15, 2019

Featured Articles

Grounded and Discomfited: Women in the West

Grounded and Discomfited: Women in the West

Visit Whitman Mission National Historic Site outside of Walla Walla, Washington, on a fall day, and you see golden rolling hills against rich blue sky. Bright clouds float toward flat-topped ridges lined with windmills. The scenery stretches spacious and bucolic and belies the bloody past. Here, on November 29, 1847, Marcus and Narcissa Whitman, a doctor and his missionary wife, and eleven others were famously massacred. Five Cayuse Indian men were accused of the crime and hanged. News of the violence caused legislators in Washington D.C. to give the territory an official name, Oregon, and to assign a provisional governor who immediately declared war on the Cayuse Nation. In I Am a Stranger Here Myself, winner of the 2017 River Teeth book prize, Debra Gwartney revisits this history....

Keeping Connected to the Natural World

Keeping Connected to the Natural World

Most days my wife and I read a book aloud at dinnertime and we each read a book silently at bedtime. Sometimes one book reverberates with the other, cumulatively expanding our consciousness. That happened when we read Hope Jahren’s Lab Girl together and I read Elizabeth Rush’s Rising over the same period. ...

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